Tag Archives: federal budget

Proposed Legislative Changes to the Taxation of Employee Stock Options in Canada

In the 2019 Federal Budget, the Canadian government outlined its proposal to introduce a $200,000 annual limit on employee stock option grants for employees of “large, long-established, mature firms”. The government takes the view that the current regime of preferential tax treatment for employee stock options does not help to achieve the policy objective of supporting younger and growing Canadian businesses, but instead, disproportionally benefits executives of large, mature companies who take advantage of the rules as a preferred form of compensation. 

In an effort to provide further clarifications to the proposed new stock options rules, the Department of Finance released a Notice of Ways and Means Motionon June 17, 2019.

Current Regime

Under the current stock option rules, pursuant to subsection 7(1) of the Income Tax Act (Canada) (the “Act”), at the time when employee stock options are exercised by an employee, a taxable benefit is added to the employee’s taxable income to the extent the fair market value (“FMV”) of the underlying shares exceeds the exercise price specified in the option agreement. However, provided that at the time of the grant, the options are not in-the-money (i.e. exercise price is not less than FMV) and, generally, common shares are issued upon the exercise of the options, the employee is entitled to claim a deduction under paragraph 110(1)(d) in the amount of 50% of the taxable benefit determined under subsection 7(1).

New Proposed Amendments

The new draft legislative proposals, if enacted as proposed, would impose a $200,000 annual vesting limit on employee stock option grants (based on the fair market value of the underlying shares at the time the options are granted) that could be entitled to receive the 50% deduction allowed under paragraph 110(1)(d). 

Under the new regime, a vesting year in respect of an option agreement is determined by either: (i) the calendar year in which the employee is first able to exercise his or her option as specified in the option agreement; or (ii) if the option agreement does not specify a vesting time, the first calendar year in which the option can reasonably be expected to be exercised.

The new annual vesting limit would not apply to employee stock options granted by “specified persons” as defined in the Act to mean: (i) Canadian-controlled private corporations (“CCPCs”); and (ii) non-CCPCs that meet certain prescribed conditions (yet to be released).

In addition, the new draft legislative proposals introduce a tax deduction for an employer who enters into an option agreement with its employee to grant non-qualified securities. The amount of deductions the employer is entitled to claim against its taxable income for a taxation year would be equal to the amount of taxable benefit its employees realize under subsection 7(1) in respect of non-qualified securities.

An employer would be entitled to claim such deductions under circumstances where the following conditions are met: (i) at the time of entering into the agreement, the employer notifies the employee in writing that the security is a non-qualified security; (ii) the employer notifies the Minister of National Revenue that the security is a non-qualified security in prescribed form filed with the employer’s income tax return in the year the agreement is entered into; and (iii) the employer is a specified person and the employees would have otherwise been entitled to claim the deduction under paragraph 110(1)(d).

In order to be entitled to claim the tax deduction, it is critical that the employer designates the options that would have otherwise qualified for a deduction under paragraph 110(1)(d) as non-qualified securities by specifying this in the option agreement.

The new draft legislative proposals will apply to employee stock options granted on or after January 1, 2020.

The federal government is currently seeking input on the characteristics of companies that should be considered “start-up, emerging, and scale-up companies” for purposes of the prescribed conditions as well as views on the administrative and compliance implications associated with putting such characteristics into legislation. Submissions of any comments with respect to the prescribed conditions for the consideration by the Department of Finance are due on September 16, 2019.

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Selected Tax Measures in the Federal Budget 2018 – Canada

This update is intended for those seeking additional insights into the 2018 Federal Budget including its impact on both domestic and multinational enterprises.

The Minister of Finance (Canada), the Honourable Bill Morneau, presented the Government of Canada’s (the “Federal Government”) 2018 Federal Budget (“Budget 2018”) on February 27th, 2018 (“Budget Day”). Budget 2018 contains significant proposals to amend the Income Tax Act (Canada) (the “ITA”) and the Excise Tax Act (the “ETA”) while also providing updates on previously announced tax measures and policies.

Significant Budget 2018 proposals and updates include:

  • Introduction of simplified measures (compared to the July 2017 proposals) applicable to passive investment income in a private corporation that will: (i) limit access to the small business rate for small businesses with significant passive savings, and (ii) limit access to refundable taxes for larger Canadian-controlled private corporations (“CCPCs”).
  • Rules applicable to equity-based financial arrangements including synthetic equity arrangements and securities lending arrangements.
  • Rules to prevent tax-free distributions by Canadian corporations to non-resident shareholders through the use of certain transactions involving partnerships and trusts.
  • Modification of the foreign affiliate provisions so certain rules cannot be avoided through the use of “tracking arrangements”.
  • Updates on Canada’s participation in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (“OECD”) project on Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (“BEPS”).

Our full analysis of selected proposals and tax measures can be found on Fasken.com.facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmail

Selected Tax Measures in the Canadian Federal Budget 2017

canada-1184869_1920The Minister of Finance (Canada), the Honourable Bill Morneau, presented the Government of Canada’s 2017 Federal Budget (“Budget 2017“) on March 22, 2017. Budget 2017 contains significant proposals to amend the Income Tax Act (Canada) and the Excise Tax Act (Canada) while also providing updates on previously announced tax measures and policies.

Significant Budget 2017 proposals and updates include:

  • Investing an additional $523.9 million over five years to prevent tax evasion and improve tax compliance.
  • Extending the mutual fund merger rules to “switch” funds and segregated funds.
  • Extending base erosion rules to Canadian life insurers with foreign branches.
  • Two measures that clarify the timing of recognition of gains and losses on derivatives held on income account.
  • Updates on Canada’s participation in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development project on Base Erosion and Profit Shifting.

Our full analysis of selected proposals and tax measures can be found on Fasken.com.facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmail